(The quickest way to register)

Forum

  1. User picture
    • c۞g on Tue 05 Apr 2011
    • 01:02:06 AM UTC

    Privacy tracker domains

    Snagged these domains from: www.privacychoice.org
    specifically, http://www.privacychoice.org/companies/all

    Some I have previously rated, others are "new" to me
    all are used to invade privacy to the extent that they track a user's browsing .
    They're not Spyware as defined
    nor are they Adware as defined
    but the scorecard comment section doesn't have an "Advertiser / Tracking" category, so Spyware or adware is the best choice (other may desire Ethical issues).

    For those I have not previously rated I decided upon:
    Trustworthiness
    Vendor reliability
    Privacy
    Child safety = unrated

    Make your own determinations after you've visited them

    List of domains/hosts:

    Edit: 28 December, 2012
    removed listed domains

    PrivacyChoice's tracker domain list.
    http://www.privacychoice.org/companies/all
    no longer is available, they have redesigned their site and entering a domain name to "check" produces no results (no submit available)

    To check validity of a "listed domain" use this page: http://privacychoice.org/trackerblock/all_companies_tpl

    ∞ - and you and I Opto, ergo sum

Comments:

  1. User picture
    • Ruedii on Sat 23 Apr 2011
    • 08:24:04 AM UTC

    RE: Privacy tracker domains

    You really shouldn't blanket label sites without verifying each and every one in both their privacy policy, external sites, and make sure that any external site complaints don't predate the last time the site changed hands.

    Just because a site offers a way to opt out of their tracking functions, doesn't mean that is unethical, in fact that is more ethical.

    What is unethical is tracking without even implying that you are doing so (which the sites on this list that are ad companies clearly do) but not all the sites on the list do this. Many of them are retailers or providers of other services, so they shouldn't necessarily be listed as having an extremely bad rating, unless you verify their privacy and site functions that use tracking, to see if it's appropriate, and check that they are properly honoring opt-out options.

    For instance, amazon.com allows you to opt-out of tracking, but without it they can't recommend products that you would like. They also allow you to tell them disregard past browsing, purchases, and ratings that you feel don't properly represent your buying habit, if you choose to keep these features on. While this system isn't perfect (especially since you can't disable tracking for single sessions, or tell it not to use data from a purchase for tracking purposes.) However, they do disclose their use of data, allow you to opt out, and do not disclose the data to third parties without your permission. This is all in all a decent privacy issue, but one would understand why some people would want to opt-out of their tracking functions, and they do allow this.

    • User picture
      • c۞g on Sat 23 Apr 2011
      • 04:17:43 PM UTC

      RE: Privacy tracker domains

      @ Ruedii

      without verifying
      I sourced: http://www.privacychoice.org/ as the verifier

      doesn't mean that is unethical
      Agree, which is why I recommended to use the comment category Spyware or adware
      however, others who feel tracking users without prior explicit approval; aka: "Opt-In" may use Ethical issues

      What is unethical is tracking without even implying that you are doing so
      I have never seen a pop-up or site notice from anyone stating:
      We are tracking your browser habits. We have recorded your browser history. We shall follow you on this site and continue to do so when you leave.
      For the most part, tracking domains are not viewed by the user, they are thrown in as HTTP requests while another page / site loads.

      For instance, amazon.com allows you to opt-out of tracking, but without it they can't recommend products that you would like.
      When I go to Amazon.com or other similar retail / auction site, I already know what I'm looking for - it's why I'm there. These "recommended items" are pure market-speak, they're the reason for on-site advertisements, and the cause for user tracking.

      opt-out of their tracking functions, and they do allow this.
      By means of a cookie, which when the browser cache is cleared, no longer exists and hence the user is now tracked again.

      I am a proponent of Opt-In where you explicitly allow the site (per single site - no 3rd parties) to track via a permission-based cookie. When the browser cache is cleared, permissions cease until reacquired.

      ∞ - and you and I Opto, ergo sum

      • User picture
        • Shadowhawk4735 on Sat 20 Aug 2011
        • 10:17:22 PM UTC

        RE: Privacy tracker domains

        The "Opt-In" idea you mention makes sense, if tracking resumes when an "Opt-Out" cookie is deleted from the cache. This would make a good addition to a comprehensive, universal internet privacy standard.

      • User picture
        • Ruedii on Mon 19 Mar 2012
        • 02:02:41 AM UTC

        RE: Privacy tracker domains

        Simply put, blanket commenting is good. However, blanket rating is not. If you yourself have not verified the privacy policy don't set the rating, just file a comment.

        There is a difference between ratings and comments.

        Generally a beacon that notifies users of it's presence and provides a link in that notice to opt-out procedure is good. Of course, an opt-in or honoring the do-not-track header would be excellent.

        Remember, some services require a degree cross site interaction to function, such as reddit, and digg. Of course if by policy they also use it as a beacon even if you don't sign up for their service, that could be an ethical issue.

        I hope you understand where I am coming at. Blanket writing comments is good, but ratings are another issue.

        You need to look deeper first hand the methods of the company are bad, if you give a company a bad rating. Simply being on a list that is rather generic, such as having cross site tracking functionality, does not mean much. However, it is worth noting in the comments.

        This is why there is a policy saying ratings should use first hand experience. Reading a web site's name on a list is not first hand experience, that is second hand experience. The person who wrote the list has first hand experience, and hopefully would know exactly the degree of tracking the site does and whether or not it is necessary for the service.

        • User picture
          • c۞g on Mon 19 Mar 2012
          • 02:28:32 AM UTC

          RE: Privacy tracker domains

          Originally posted by: Ruedii
          Simply put, blanket commenting is good. However, blanket rating is not.

          The mass rating tool does not allow for commenting on sites without ratings, nor does it allow rating sites without entering a comment.
          You need to look deeper first hand the methods of the company are bad, if you give a company a bad rating.

          Read the OP (first post)
          www.privacychoice.org has already investigated domains which track users browsing habits.

          Also the OP suggest a Cautionary rating, not poor ratings.

          If a domain has a lower reputation, then it may be by users who have rated without leaving comment; in WOT comments are optional, they have no affect to reputation. Opening a scorecard simply to comment without rating is both a waste of time and being irresponsible, in fact one could assume multiple comments from a user who doesn't rate to be spam.

          ∞ - and you and I Opto, ergo sum

      • User picture
        • my2pennies on Tue 15 Jan 2013
        • 07:59:49 PM UTC

        RE: Privacy tracker domains

        Don't mean to troll on an old post, but:

        "When I go to Amazon.com or other similar retail / auction site, I already know what I'm looking for - it's why I'm there."

        There's no question that this would be true for everyone. But if you were looking for a TV for instance, and you knew exactly what TV you wanted, but weren't sure about the price, whether it fit into your budget, etc., and decide that maybe one slightly cheaper may be a better choice....

        "These "recommended items" are pure market-speak, they're the reason for on-site advertisements, and the cause for user tracking."

        Your exactly correct - that IS the reason for the recommendations on the sidebar, or lower on the page - to assist the shopper find perhaps a better product to fit his/her needs. Additionally, if you were a collector of widgets, and you purchased "xyz platinum widget" last time you visited exampleretailsite.com, it's likely you may be interested in "xyz titanium series widget", and quite possibly didn't even know that widget was on the market. Do you see where I'm going with this? It's something that tracks your behavior on their website, to enhance the user experience for the majority of their customers. It may not be viewed as an enhancement to all, but I can't see how offering similar items to something you are searching for or purchased previously is unethical or invades on your privacy.

        **By the way, do you have/use a grocery store "club card" or a "rewards" card? It's very likely you do, because you would want the "cheaper" prices that you get just for signing up for the free card that takes 2 minutes. Most stores offering these free cards (not to be mistaken for credit cards - sheerly just a card that you have for discounted goods, that cost nothing to obtain. (Safeway, Albertsons, Fred Meyer, Kroger, Top Foods, Target, Best Buy, Rite-Aid, Walgreens, etc. You name the big stores - some of these may not be nationwide, but are just examples in my own region in the Northwest - all of them have these cards). So why do this ???:
        1) To Give you the warm fuzzy feeling that you just saved a bunch on a block of cheese? - sure
        2) To make you feel special that you get discounts others don't? - sure (but it's not true, the avg. of customers that regularly frequent a particular store - research has shown that (depending on industry and store/brand/etc.) ranges from 92% - 97% of overall customers. Thus, almost everybody is getting this "membership" discount.

        So #'s 1 & 2 are the reasons YOU want the membership card or think you need it. Not the reason they exist. The items they "discount" to card holders are not really discounts at all. They are items that would be on sale anyways if they didn't have these "club/savings/rewards/loyalty" cards. They exist for one reason and one reason only - to see what you buy and what others buy most frequently. When you buy them, how long until you buy the same item again, etc. Do you feel that this invades your privacy? Had you ever thought about this? Did they ever give you a "pop-up window" or hold a big neon sign saying:

        "We are going to use this to track purchases you make so we know what to put in the local circulars and how often we plan to do it. We are going to see exactly what threshold/price we can get away with before sales for an item start to drop."
        ?

        Nope, they never did... But I don't ever hear anyone complain about this. The cookies they complain about are never the ones they get for $1 off with their club card, but the cookies that they don't understand are not of malicious or unethical behavior whatsoever.

        • User picture
          • cecropiamoth on Sat 22 Jun 2013
          • 01:55:01 PM UTC

          RE: Privacy tracker domains

          Three reasons why sites that track you for purposes of offering you ads about kinds of stuff you're interested in are bad:

          1. Some people don't like ads appearing everywhere. Most of the time we're on the Internet for fun and fellowship, not commerce.

          2. Millions of people buy "unsafe" things. E.g., from stuff about gay life accessed from some African countries, through marijuana-using accessories in much of the southern United States, through politics disapproved or even dangerous in your country (e.g., socialism in much of the US). Other people in your family might become troublesome if they use your computer and see ads for the disapproved stuff or idea popping up everywhere.

          3. Disapproved ideas and products change with time, but the tracking computers seem to retain the info they obtain about the online travels of the computer with your DNS address for a long time, presenting future dangers to you from governments. E.g., visits online to Islamic sites might come back to haunt someone of Arabic origin in the USA who visits one, when later the site gets put on the US "terrorists" list.

          There are probably many others.

    • User picture
      • zbrowman on Thu 01 Aug 2013
      • 08:30:44 PM UTC

      RE: Privacy tracker domains

      I agree wholeheartedly.

      I'm a marketer and a lot of the vendors I use are getting bad ratings when they're not unethical companies with poor customer service.

      For example I just went to visit Adroll... They have a bad rating because the entire business is centered around tracking and targeting visitors to other websites.

      This negative rating doesn't help me at all decide whether or not I want to do business with them - it's just been flagged numerous times for cookie-ing users. Which is the whole point.

      Zach

  2. User picture
    • SuperHero58 on Sat 23 Apr 2011
    • 02:02:59 PM UTC

    RE: Privacy tracker domains

    etypeusa.com
    Edit =

  3. User picture
    • redir on Sun 25 Sep 2011
    • 01:11:56 AM UTC

    RE: Privacy tracker domains

    There is 23 trackers on this site only!!!!

  4. User picture
    • c۞g on Thu 20 Oct 2011
    • 11:50:35 PM UTC

    RE: Privacy tracker domains

    removed: jaroop.com
    no longer listed in PrivacyChoice's tracker domain list.
    http://www.privacychoice.org/companies/all

    Anyone who has rated this domain referencing this topic, please delete your ratings and remove your comment
    http://www.mywot.com/scorecard/jaroop.com

    ∞ - and you and I Opto, ergo sum

  5. User picture
    • mattcoxonline on Mon 24 Oct 2011
    • 06:38:20 PM UTC

    RE: Privacy tracker domains

    I'd explicitly like you to look into the listing of http://reinvigorate.net .

    It's an Analytics tool, akin to that of Google Analytics, which isn't listed as being negative by either WOT or Privacy Choice (who even use Google's service themselves to collect data about users). So, I'd like to find out how Reinvigorate specifically differs from the privacy issues that Google Analytics holds.

    Reinvigorate actually seem to collect LESS data than Google do with Analytics - so I'm wondering where the problem lies? And if Google shows to be more invasive than Reinvigorate, Google Analytics should also be listed above.

    • User picture
      • MrElvey on Sat 25 Feb 2012
      • 07:38:39 PM UTC

      RE: Privacy tracker domains

      Seems like a good question! I wonder why the OP is ignoring it.

    • User picture
      • Ruedii on Mon 19 Mar 2012
      • 02:12:40 AM UTC

      RE: Privacy tracker domains

      Your issues are no privacy policies for consumers and no opt-out.

      Fix those and you should be fine.

      Google may collect more, but they are honest to people about it, and allow people to opt-out.

      Google also now has policies to purge IP logs and cookie logs after a certain amount of time. However this took quite a bit of requesting to get them to do.

      It would be nice, if all the analytic companies used a tiny little image that said "analytics by: service provider" that functioned as a hyperlink to the analytic companies consumer information page. But this will never happen.

      The best we have is companies that greatly encourage companies to list information the use of their services somewhere on their site. This is another policy I like about Google.

  6. User picture
    • Dr C on Tue 25 Oct 2011
    • 02:57:15 PM UTC

    RE: Privacy tracker domains

    There are 25 trackers on this site. A good tracking program (free) is Ghostery.chrome://ghostery/content/options.html

    • User picture
      • Ruedii on Mon 19 Mar 2012
      • 02:13:52 AM UTC

      RE: Privacy tracker domains

      Yes ghostery is very useful. I agree. I personally wish it would detect and preserve most major opt-out signatures, but it will improve over time.

  7. User picture
    • c۞g on Sat 11 Feb 2012
    • 06:35:18 AM UTC

    RE: Privacy tracker domains

    adsfac.info

    ∞ - and you and I Opto, ergo sum

  8. User picture
    • miramiracute on Wed 29 May 2013
    • 07:39:29 PM UTC

    RE: Privacy tracker domains

    To this old post: I only go to some of these sites hoping for an opt-out choice. Otherwise I do it off of about ads.

    With amazon I like to know what's new in a certain genre and find out about more of this stuff. Then I check stuff out at the library.

  9. User picture
    • JackE1930 on Fri 14 Feb 2014
    • 07:31:40 PM UTC

    RE: Privacy tracker domains

    If you are concerned about websites being able to track you, there is a tool that you can download fro CNET.com at download.com. This tool is Abine's DoNotTrackMe which I've been using for over a year now. It tells me who is trying to track my use of the internet and allows me to block each one individually. The default is to block all of the tracking website until you give them permission. My exposure to spam has dropped dramatically since adding this tool to my Firefox browser.