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  1. User picture
    • Anonymous on Sat 12 Jun 2010
    • 08:31:15 PM UTC

    Perfect Optimizer

    Just looking around and thought I would check out this site.WOT top members had by and large rated it red as a rouge.In the past two days there have been many new members rating this site up.It has over two thousand greens for it now.I know comments are not ratings but some newb might be drawn in by all these positive comments being agreed to.Very suspiciously though in the past two days.All red comments have been voted down.To go to this much effort would make you think that they are fairly well organized.
    Perhaps we could rate them down again to balance things up.I rated every red comment by WOT members up.And every green comment done in the past two days down.
    For anyone interested here is the scorecard link.

    http://www.mywot.com/scorecard/perfectoptimizer...

Comments:

  1. User picture
    • Bob Zenith (not verified) on Sat 12 Jun 2010
    • 08:42:19 PM UTC

    Comment votes disabled

    When I visit the scorecard, I see that comment votes have been disabled for the site.

    Clean air. Fresh Water. Open space. Pollution is not the Solution.
    Nature recycles everything. So should people.

  2. User picture
    • MysteryFCM on Sat 12 Jun 2010
    • 10:57:37 PM UTC

    Errr ....

    "Perhaps we could rate them down again to balance things up.I rated every red comment by WOT members up.And every green comment done in the past two days down"

    Errr, that's called rating abuse. Have you actually bothered to check the website and the software it offers (FYI: I have), as the statement you've made, suggests you're basing your ratings purely on what others have said.

    Regards
    Steven Burn
    Ur I.T. Mate Group / hpHosts
    it-mate.co.uk / hosts-file.net

  3. User picture
    • Anonymous on Sun 13 Jun 2010
    • 07:14:24 AM UTC

    Rating Abuse

    I think when a lot of new members rate a site up in the period of two days its one,very fishy and two rating abuse.I have never seen a couple of thousand positive greens on even the best sites.
    Also there were a lot of references to blacklists by top members.If you have to go to every rouge site to check it out,even though top rater's give their sources is a bit of a waste of time IMHO.A lot of these rater's that use these lists do not check out each site.BTW I do not have the mass rating tool and am not interested in it.But they often post a list of bad sites for others to rate.Are these Top Rater's Wrong also.

  4. User picture
    • Sami on Sun 13 Jun 2010
    • 07:14:23 AM UTC

    Re: Perfect Optimizer

    If anyone is curious, the site had lots of recent comments that seem to have originated from spammers in China and the US. Here are the other domains involved in the spammy action this time:

    activepcoptimizer.com
    boostersonpc.com
    fixmum.com
    perfectoptimizer.com
    registrymum.com
    windowsclear.com

    It might be interesting to investigate what exactly are these sites are selling and who owns them.

    There's another interesting thing too. Roughly half of the spam accounts were created from the US netblock 65.49.2.0/24, which has been allocated to a company called Sophidea, Inc. There's hardly any information about the company on the web, but this is not the first spam indicent we've seen from this address block.

    Soon after IObit had been accused of stealing data, for example, fake users from this netblock spent weeks spamming good comments for iobit.com and bad comments for malwarebytes.org, apparently in a foolish attempt to change the reputations. Coincidence? I think not.

    So what's going on here...? Are these spammers for hire, a bunch of open proxy servers, or what?

    • User picture
      • Sami on Sun 13 Jun 2010
      • 06:29:11 PM UTC

      Re: Proxies

      Wikipedia tells me the address ranges 65.49.2.0/24 and 65.49.14.0/24 are open proxy servers, which explains pretty much everything. Details here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Database_re...

    • User picture
      • Nulander on Mon 14 Jun 2010
      • 01:55:09 PM UTC

      If they're use that sort of

      If they're use that sort of "promotional" way to push a good rating, it must be considered a potential scam-ware hidden under the cowl. That is a suspicious activity. If the software is so good, why act like that? Worries about competitors? There's the WOT Badge for that.

      -----
      MF IT-UESC - Protecting your Digital Experience. Now.

  5. User picture
    • c۞g on Sun 13 Jun 2010
    • 09:08:20 AM UTC

    weskysoft.com

    weskysoft.com - whois

    product names include:
    "perfect optimizer"
    "redistry mum"
    "registry G"

    Affiliate registry "cleaner" which is not malware but IS spyware.

    Domains with direct downloads:

    activepcoptimizer.com
    activepcoptimizer.com
    boostersonpc.com
    ccc-cleaner.com
    ccleanercom.com
    cleanerccc.com
    comccleaner.com
    duplicate-filesremover.com
    fixmum.com
    free-optimizer-pc.com
    free-optimizer.com
    free-pc-optimizer.com
    memory-virtual.com
    memoryvirtual.com
    oneclickmaintenance.net
    optimizerfree.com
    optimizerfreepc.com
    optimizertool.com
    outlookexpressfix.org
    pcfreeoptimizer.com
    perfectoptimizer.com
    perfectoptimizer5.com
    registry-error-repair.net
    registryg.com
    registrymum.com
    registryrepairdoctor.com
    snmasteridx.com
    tunewindows.com
    virtual-memory-low.com
    weskysoft.com
    windowsclear.com

    clickBank download / redirects:
    easycleare.pagestyle.hop.clickbank.net
    zzzzz.regmum.hop.clickbank.net

    "link sites" advertising:
    thebleeder.com/system-optimization/PAGESTYLE.htm
    thegreatkhali.org/2010/06/05/registry-mum-great-registry-cleaner-in-5-languages/
    snmaster4idx.blogstream.com

    -------
    WOT Services Ltd. - gives us safety through Web of Trust.
    WOT Community - gives us security through unity.
    Thank you all
    - G7W

  6. User picture
    • shazza on Sun 13 Jun 2010
    • 09:23:35 AM UTC

    Thanks g7w

    weskysoft.com directs to iis.net, does anyone know this site?
    Added
    weskysoft-inc.software.informer.com
    dodownload.com
    morefreeinformation.com

    • User picture
      • Sami on Sun 13 Jun 2010
      • 09:26:30 AM UTC

      Re: Thanks g7w

      That looks like the standard IIS welcome page. Microsoft owns iis.net and it has nothing to do with the other sites.

    • User picture
      • _Nemo on Sun 13 Jun 2010
      • 09:34:13 AM UTC

      Sami is right

      The site you're see on weskeysoft.com make use of the Microsoft shortlink service go.microsoft.com see the scorecard.

    • User picture
      • c۞g on Sun 13 Jun 2010
      • 09:39:15 AM UTC

      morefreeinformation.com

      morefreeinformation.com
      is an article site, it's not directly related - any "author" can create an article and add a link.

      I must have come across a dozen like it searching for the related domains.
      I didn't include them since 1 post should not blacklist the entire site.
      I figure if a WOT user reads the article, clicks a link then they will see a WOT Warning about the destination domain.

  7. User picture
    • weskysoft on Sun 13 Jun 2010
    • 05:55:59 PM UTC

    To all members who post here and on our websites.

    Hi Everyone here,

    It is Neil Lee, the Marketing Director of the Weskysoft Inc. It is good to know you.

    Yesterday one of our partners emailed and told us that all of our sites are ranked low here, even some of them that are still under development were ranked low.

    We checked the comments and found the post here.

    We can make the conclusion that some of our competitors illegally did that and want to bring our name down. From what you posted above, we can say that they have posted a lot of good comments to our sites and our products.

    We hope that you can remove this post and all comments as they are not TRUE. Thanks in advance.

    Looking forward to your quick reply.

    Neil Lee
    Weskysoft Inc.
    Neallee@Weskysoft.com

    • User picture
      • Sami on Sun 13 Jun 2010
      • 06:19:00 PM UTC

      Re: To all members who post here and on our websites.

      We can make the conclusion that some of our competitors illegally did that and want to bring our name down

      Based on the evidence I've seen, I'm making a conclusion that you just made that up. In fact, I have several reasons to believe the spam originated from you and not from a competitor.

      • User picture
        • Nulander on Wed 16 Jun 2010
        • 08:23:53 PM UTC

        Continue the discussion here on public, not on my wall. Thanks.

        User Weskysoft placed this on my personal wall.

        "I read your comments to our websites. I am wondering why you said that Weskysoft software are malicious content or viruses. If you think which part of our software makes you think our software is like what you said on our sites, please feel free to let me know.

        Have you tested our software before you made the conclusion like that?

        In fact all of our software belong to the shareware, the clients can try the software before they decide to buy, this mode is used by many top companies like PCTools, iolo and even the Symantec company. The products which similar to ours like System Mechanic and Registry Mechanic.

        The comments you left on the following sites http://www.activepcoptimizer.com
        http://www.boostersonpc.com
        http://www.weskysoft.com
        http://www.perfectoptimizer5.com
        http://www.perfectoptimizer.com
        http://www.registrymum.com
        http://www.fixmum.com
        http://www.windowsclear.com

        We think you should test our software first to see whether it is like what you said.
        You, as an experienced man in Mywot.com, should not copy what others said without any investigation.

        And we hope you test our software first and then remove these comments and said the true fact about our software.

        I look forward to your quick reply.

        Neil Lee
        Weskysoft Inc.

        Weskysoft Inc. is a software R&D company that provides the clients with the easy-to-use programs to check, repair PC errors and speed up computers."

        Please continue the discussion of the topic here, not there.
        -----
        MF IT-UESC - Protecting your Digital Experience. Now.

        • User picture
          • MysteryFCM on Wed 16 Jun 2010
          • 08:37:37 PM UTC

          ...

          Got virtually the same via e-mail.

          Regards
          Steven Burn
          Ur I.T. Mate Group / hpHosts
          it-mate.co.uk / hosts-file.net

        • User picture
          • c۞g on Wed 16 Jun 2010
          • 09:32:34 PM UTC

          same thing

          Same thing, but a little more detailed.
          spamming personal boards rather than keeping discussion in this thread.

          Maybe I should just delete my comments, maintain the poor ratings...

          Meh! Comments stay, others should see this thread when they come across one of these sites.

        • User picture
          • _Nemo on Thu 17 Jun 2010
          • 05:17:14 AM UTC

          Same here

          with roughly the same text.

          @g7w
          I agree, the comments should stay on the scorecards.

    • User picture
      • c۞g on Sun 13 Jun 2010
      • 09:24:04 PM UTC

      Neil Lee

      Hello Neil Lee

      I'm curious, exactly what is the price of tea in China?

  8. User picture
    • shazza on Sun 13 Jun 2010
    • 06:37:26 PM UTC

    @weskysoft

    You're offering Rogue software / scareware, dont bother trying to explain the spamming.

  9. User picture
    • Nulander on Mon 14 Jun 2010
    • 02:29:14 PM UTC

    Personally, and this is just

    [OT a little bit]

    Personally, and this is just a my idea, is that Microsoft should introduce a solution directly on the OS to solve the Registry problems, instead of filling it with useless crap-ware.
    This leak is what drive a lot of fraud-dudes to produce suspicious software, when it could be cut directly from the roots introducing an official build-in software to do some OS-clean up (like it was, in some ways, MS OneCare).

    I still continue to be annoyed for the fact that they removed the Registry monitor and other little tidbits present on Windows Defender, on the new MSE. Ok, there SysInternals tools, but that ones are not so easy to use as the functions included on Defender, expecially for newbies.

    [/OT a little bit]
    -----
    MF IT-UESC - Protecting your Digital Experience. Now.

  10. User picture
    • BobJam (not verified) on Tue 15 Jun 2010
    • 02:22:47 AM UTC

    Responses?

    @ g7w,

    "I'm curious, exactly what is the price of tea in China?"
    Will be interesting to see if old Neil gets this.

    @ shazza,

    Very good point . . . will also be interesting to see if this Neil Lee person responds to this.

    @ MassimilianoF,

    Registry entries RARELY need to be removed to enhance performance (indeed there are many who believe, myself included, AND Mark Russinovich, MSMVP and founder of SysInternals, and now a VP with Microsoft) that registry tweaking will NOT enhance performance noticeably or appreciably.

    For example, removing stray .dll's or removing unused help files from the registry will basically do nothing to enhance performance.

    I don't disagree that a registry modification may be in order, but only when performed by an experienced user and only when the user knows EXACTLY what that key means.

    Someone once compared the registry size to that of a parking lot the size of Montana, and cleaning the registry akin to sweeping out a single parking space. Unless you're an experienced user and know what cleaning out that parking space will do to the system, you shouldn't mess with it.

    Novices . . . even if Microsoft introduces something beyond "regedit" (which is sufficient for registry modifications by experienced users anyway) . . . STAY AWAY FROM THE REGISTRY.

    I don't know if this was Microsoft's motivation for removing registry tools from Defender, but a good reason to do that would be to discourage novices from messing with the registry. Indeed, the Microsoft KB is full of articles on how to unscrew the registry because novices insist on messing with it.

    My suspicion is that this is because they buy into all the fraudulent advertisements that claim registry cleaning will enhance performance. And that, IMO, is why these rogues thrive.

    • User picture
      • Nulander on Tue 15 Jun 2010
      • 03:07:33 AM UTC

      > For example, removing

      > For example, removing stray .dll's or removing unused help files from the registry will basically do nothing to enhance performance.

      About speed, I agree with you. Even if you remove old/unused entries, the margin of gain is little, but about functionalities, it's a different matter. I have seen a lot of XPs acting oddly due to strange problems present inside the registry. I'm talking about pressing the right-click and seeing a setup come out from nothing (of a legit software), asking for uninstall etc.
      Of course, a run of a good Registry repair tool saved the day every time, but in this case, I would better define it as "Registry Optimization/Maintenance" than "Performance", more pointed to data-access times, velocity on application loading etc.

      > I don't disagree that a registry modification may be in order, but only when performed by an
      > experienced user and only when the user knows EXACTLY what that key means.

      Uhm, hard. Usually registry don't have to be touched by normal users, so keys found inside, placed by software, are there for an "Unknown reason" (of course if you don't reverse the code to understand what the application does, but it rarely happend; more to malware than normal software) and it is totally undocumented.

      > STAY AWAY FROM THE REGISTRY

      A flick to the registry and the system relentlessly crumble. Even the System Restore don't do miracles (and I suggest using it only for Device-Driver installation/update fail, never in case of a malware break).

      -----
      MF IT-UESC - Protecting your Digital Experience. Now.

      • User picture
        • Jazspeak on Wed 16 Jun 2010
        • 02:02:37 PM UTC

        Re: Clean Registry

        The perceived need for a clean registry harks back to the days when computers were slow and operating systems and hard drives were small.

        It is true that modern computers are less bothered by untidy registries and large Master File Tables. However, it is worth cleaning the registry from the point of view of deleting references to programs, files, and folders that are no longer on the computer, and which the users might not want anyone else to know about.

        One of the problems with scam registry scanners is that they can log a copy of the unsuspecting user's computer and then know everything about the sorts of uses to which the computer is, and has been, put. Probably best not to let any online registry scanner have that sort of opportunity.

        • User picture
          • Nulander on Wed 16 Jun 2010
          • 05:46:20 PM UTC

          > It is true that modern

          > It is true that modern computers are less bothered by untidy registries and large Master File Tables. However, it is worth
          > cleaning the registry from the point of view of deleting references to programs, files, and folders that are no longer on
          > the computer, and which the users might not want anyone else to know about.

          The problem is that the OS should already take care of such problems automatically and not rely on the user to keep maintenance about an aspect of the operative enviroment that should be correcly handled by the computer itself. This not happend due to some reasons? Ok, the OS-producer should release a tool that solve the issue, without any charge for the user.

          But IMHO, this is some sort of suspicious marketing strategy introduced in order to sell "useless-ware" (because If the OS change, or the user update the software, paying for "nothing" (it's not a real object, only a way to abstract electrical pulses), or the tool is useless).
          Try to wonder now, with the new solid-state HDs, what an user should do with the professional-defrag software he has bought in the past, considering that such types of HDs doesn't need the same defrag-maintenance efforts than the old ones. Results? Money no more worthy to be spent. And this is a secondary reason for software piracy.

          This is unfair and, about this facts, I agree with Linux-Fanboys when they say that on their OSses there's not such type of "cheating".

          > One of the problems with scam registry scanners is that they can log a copy of the unsuspecting user's computer and then know
          > everything about the sorts of uses to which the computer is, and has been, put. Probably best not to let any online registry scanner
          > have that sort of opportunity.

          This type of behavior should already be contemplated for all the software, and hypothetical scanners, that remotely analyze systems. Other than there's a lot of limitations on scanning systems nowadays (try to think about sandboxes-defences implemented on WinVista/Seven, Third-Party programs or hardcoded on Browsers themselves).
          -----
          MF IT-UESC - Protecting your Digital Experience. Now.

          • User picture
            • MysteryFCM on Wed 16 Jun 2010
            • 06:12:30 PM UTC

            .....

            You'll never see anything like this built directly into Windows for two prime reasons;

            1. Anti competition lawsuits against Microsoft

            2. Complexity

            Remember: Linux is a whole different world when it comes to how software is installed, and information is stored. Linux has it the right way (and I hate saying that), which is why the issue almost doesn't exist (though that's not to say other issues related to it don't exist - store enough data and somewhere along the line, something will need to be done to clean it up).

            When a program is installed, information is inserted into the registry, similarly the majority of programs store configs etc in the registry - two things they should never have been allowed to do. File assoc's are also stored there, along with a multitude of other things.

            Programs can and do, exist to clean up some of the mess, but the more these programs try to do, the more they risk borking the entire system due to some config they couldn't account for, or properly work with, which is why the vast majority of us do not recommend people use such.

            In short, if you can find a program that doesn't need installing, use it, if you can talk the dev into stopping the storage of info in the registry, do it, that's about the best you can do in the long term, to preserve the registry.

            Regards
            Steven Burn
            Ur I.T. Mate Group / hpHosts
            it-mate.co.uk / hosts-file.net

            • User picture
              • Nulander on Wed 16 Jun 2010
              • 08:11:33 PM UTC

              ---

              Even if the software is made available with a facultative download?
              If so, why the Anti-competitor Committee didn't say anything for the firewall?

              > Programs can and do, exist to clean up some of the mess, but the more these programs try to do, the more they risk borking the entire
              > system due to some config they couldn't account for, or properly work with, which is why the vast majority of us do not recommend
              > people use such.

              System Registry has been a mistake under some points of view. The difficulty about the cleaning system is almost related to the presence of unknown keys written by software, to not mention DRM (think about Securom and his System Hack in order to prevent the key-sweeping of it from the OS). Ok, the best way is to reinstall the system, but of course this could not be done due to considerable reasons. Other solutions are possible, but surely more laborious on their applications (like doing backup of the clean registry to restore it later when the presence of the applications are no more needed).

              Maybe the "Portable" versions of the software will help in order to keep the reg-cluttering but they're not the panacea, having side-effects on their side.

              -----
              MF IT-UESC - Protecting your Digital Experience. Now.

              • User picture
                • MysteryFCM on Wed 16 Jun 2010
                • 08:40:36 PM UTC

                ....

                "If so, why the Anti-competitor Committee didn't say anything for the firewall?"

                Because vendors love suing Microsoft. Just look at the Google vs Microsoft thing (hillarious given Google are now doing an OS with a built in browser).

                Regards
                Steven Burn
                Ur I.T. Mate Group / hpHosts
                it-mate.co.uk / hosts-file.net

                • User picture
                  • Nulander on Thu 17 Jun 2010
                  • 12:12:45 AM UTC

                  ---

                  > Because vendors love suing Microsoft.

                  Trolls never learn. Expecially if they can win and obtain a pile of money from all the war.

                  PS: SCO and Unix are out of this rule :PPP

                  -----
                  MF IT-UESC - Protecting your Digital Experience. Now.

                  • User picture
                    • MysteryFCM on Thu 17 Jun 2010
                    • 12:46:48 AM UTC

                    .....

                    I've just realised I answered the wrong question, lol. The reason they never said anything about the firewall is simply one of security, and the fact other OS's include one by default too. Put simply, Microsoft would've won that case in a heart beat.

                    Regards
                    Steven Burn
                    Ur I.T. Mate Group / hpHosts
                    it-mate.co.uk / hosts-file.net